Last two weeks: Narrative as Reality: A World Reimagined/ Selections from the Jessica and Kelvin Beachum Family Collection closes May 22

Ten works by contemporary Black artists from the Jessica and Kelvin Beachum Family collection are on view at Hamon’s Hawn Gallery until May 22. The exhibition, Narrative as Reality: A World Reimagined, presents the work of artists, Dominic Chambers, Ryan Cosbert, Robert Hodge, Nelson Makamo, Delita Martin, Sungi Mlengeya, Mario Moore, Robert Pruitt, Athi-Patra Ruga, and Ferrari Sheppard. As described by the exhibition’s curator, Dr. Valerie Gillespie, on the installation, “Each composition within the collection offers a unique story. These non-linear narratives on the Black experience, with their own distinct actualities exhibit a reality not often portrayed, yet a collective, lived experience that strives to represent a livelihood untouched.”

Dominic Chambers_The Night is Our Friend
Dominic Chambers, The Night is Our Friend, Oil on Canvas, 2020

This selection of works represents a fraction of the collection owned by the Beachums, who began acquiring works by Black artists in 2013. Of the works in their collection, they express a personal approach to their acquisitions, “We want to look back on each piece and know it represents something we love, something we remember, something historically significant, or something we never want to forget. The intergenerational component is what is most special.”

Kelvin Beachum graduated from SMU in 2010 with a B.A. in Economics and earned a Master of Liberal Studies in Organizational Dynamics in 2012. A four-year starter as offensive tackle for SMU Mustang football, he serves as a member of the Executive Boards for the Simmons School of Education and Human Development and Lyle School of Engineering. Named an SMU Emerging Leader in 2018, Kelvin honored the late Dennis Simon, his political science professor and mentor, by endowing SMU’s annual Civil Rights Pilgrimage in Simon’s name.

Drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2012, Kelvin has played for the Jacksonville Jaguars, the New York Jets and now the Arizona Cardinals during his 10-year NFL career.

Jessica Beachum graduated from Baylor in 2011 with a degree in Sociology. She earned her B.S. in Nursing in 2017 from Duquesne University and her M.S. in Healthcare Delivery in 2021 from Arizona State University.

An exhibition catalogue of Narrative as Reality is available in print and pdf through the website.

OTHER SPRING 2022 EXHIBITIONS AT SMU LIBRARIES

Two other exhibitions at SMU Libraries offer excellent opportunities for visitors this spring and summer.

Continuing to May 23, In Search of Belonging at the Hamon Arts Library, first floor reading room presents an exhibition  organized by Pride@SMU, founded by SMU senior and Queer Senator Bri Tollie. Drawing upon oral history interviews and University archives, this student-led exhibition looks at the history of LGBTQ+ organizing on campus for equality and representation.

At the Hillcrest Exhibit Hall, Send Me a Postcard: Women on the Road Across 19th – 20th Century America explores the travel experience for women from the DeGolyer Library’s holdings of rare books, pamphlets, ephemera and manuscripts, including the Archives of Women of the Southwest. This exhibition continues to August 31.

More information: https://www.smu.edu/Libraries, or email hawngallery@smu.edu.

In Search of Belonging – Opening reception on April 23, 1 – 3 pm at the Hamon Arts Library

In 2011, the Princeton Review ranked Southern Methodist University as the eleventh worst university for gay students. Then, in a dramatic shift a decade later, Campus Pride listed it among ten religious schools living up to LGBTQ-inclusive values in August 2021. However, the struggle for LGBT campus acceptance has lasted far longer than just one decade.  For LGBT students at SMU, there is a wide legacy that has yet to be honored in a multidisciplinary, public-facing project synthesizing the documented history of LGBT students. 

Kennedi, student, '22
Kennedi, student, ’22

Building on the research of the PRIDE@SMU capstone project, In Search of Belonging explores stories of LGBTQ+ student organizing — struggles for equality and recognition — through oral history and archival documents. From the eight-year fight to charter the first Gay and Lesbian Student Organization (GLSO), to the founding of SMU’s first ever gay fraternity, to the present-day work and testimonies of queer Mustangs, these past and present queer narratives elevate both the roots of the SMU LGBTQ+ community and the truth of what “Mustang Pride” looks and feels like today. Most of the LGBT student experience does not fit neatly into newspaper headlines; however, by outlining some of the key events, setbacks, and successes of the LGBT rights movement at SMU, this work initiates a conversation about LGBTQ+ acceptance on the Hilltop today, ultimately showing that there’s more work to be done.

In Search of Belonging challenges SMU to reckon with its long and recent history of LGBTQ+ marginalization, to acknowledge the pain and pride of its students, faculty, and alumni, and to live up to its stated values of equity and inclusivity — both on paper and in practice, so that every student feels like they belong.

 

 

What is the PRIDE@SMU Project? 

Founded by SMU senior and Queer Senator Bri Tollie, PRIDE@SMU is a student-led, interdisciplinary research team investigating LGBTQ+ history and experiences at SMU. The project launched in August 2021 with the help of SMU’s Office of Engaged Learning and over 10 campus partners and mentors. Since its launch, the PRIDE team has interviewed 14 queer SMU students, faculty, staff, and alumni, as well as hosted the first-ever Queer State of the University Address at SMU on February 11th, 2022. Along with this event, this research is contributing to the In Search of Belonging exhibit, as well as informing students and administrators for ongoing community event planning and campus policy reform. Managed by a diverse group of LGBTQ+ students and allies, PRIDE@SMU combines archival, oral, and institutional history to better understand the queer community’s roots at SMU.

 

Opening reception on April 23, 1 – 3 pm:

RSVP for the Opening Reception here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/in-search-of-belonging-opening-reception-tickets-304755591177. This exhibition runs from April 23 – May 23, 2022. 


Photo: Ashe Thye, SMU Pride, Student, ’23.

The Community of Cinema – March 1 Film Events at SMU

Film screening room 3rd floor Hamon
New film screening room on Hamon Arts Library’s third floor waiting for attendees to arrive on March 1

Cinema is a natural community-forming medium, and next week, when the lights dim in Hamon Library’s new third-floor film screening room on March 1st, attendees will be treated to a unique and authentic cinematic experience, complete with the whirring sound of a 16mm film projector. The new room and projector are an extension of the G. William Jones Film & Video Collection, providing a space for screenings and film programing.

Hamon Arts Library, in partnership with the World Languages & Literature Department’s 7th Annual International Film Festival invite you to the following premier events on March 1, 2022.

3-4 pm: Film Vault Tour

Curators in the G. William Jones Film & Video Collection will conduct tours of the film vault, highlighting the 16mm and 35mm films in the collection, as well as the Gene Autry Films, WFAA, KRLD, and KERA collections of newsfilm.  Register here.

LOCATION: Meet in Hamon Arts Library lobby, first floor, for start of tour. 

4 – 4:45 pm:  International Film Festival Roundtable

Attend the International Film Festival Roundtable with the following panelists:

SMU Student panelists (directing/producing team of the upcoming SMU Summer Feature): Piper Hadley, Grace Maddox, Anna Butcher, and Kaytlyn Bunting.

Bart Weiss. Associate Professor of Film, University of Texas at Arlington. Award-winning filmmaker and director/founder of the Dallas VideoFest. VIRTUAL.

Alessandro Carrera, Ph.D., Director of Italian Studies and Graduate Director of World Cultures & Literatures at the University of Houston University of Houston. Author of Fellini’s Eternal Rome: Paganism and Christianity in the Films of Federico Fellini (Bloomsbury, 2019). VIRTUAL.

LOCATION: Hawn Conference Room, accessible from the Hamon Library lobby.  Refreshments provided.

5 pm: Screening of Fellini’s La Strada on 16mm

Celebrate the Grand Launch of the Hamon Library’s new 16mm screening room with a viewing of Fellini’s 1954 epic film, La Strada.

LOCATION: 3rd floor of the Hamon Arts Library.


The new screening room puts into practice Objective 4, Goal 4 of SMU Libraries’ Strategic Plan: “Design an intellectually stimulating campus environment through programming that builds community and expands discourse.”

Narrative as Reality: A World Reimagined/ Selections from the Jessica and Kelvin Beachum Family Collection opens Feb. 18

Several paintings by contemporary Black artists from the Jessica and Kelvin Beachum Family collection will be on view at Hamon’s Hawn Gallery beginning February 18 and continuing to May 22. The exhibition, Narrative as Reality: A World Reimagined, presents the work of artists, Dominic Chambers, Ryan Cosbert, Robert Hodge, Nelson Makamo, Delita Martin, Sungi Mlengeya, Mario Moore, Robert Pruitt, Athi-Patra Ruga, and Ferrari Sheppard. As described by the exhibition’s curator, Dr. Valerie Gillespie, on the installation, “Each composition within the collection offers a unique story. These non-linear narratives on the Black experience, with their own distinct actualities exhibit a reality not often portrayed, yet a collective, lived experience that strives to represent a livelihood untouched.”

Dominic Chambers_The Night is Our Friend
Dominic Chambers, The Night is Our Friend, Oil on Canvas, 2020

This selection of paintings represents a fraction of the collection owned by the Beachums, who began acquiring works by Black artists in 2013. Of the works in their collection, they express a personal approach to their acquisitions, “We want to look back on each piece and know it represents something we love, something we remember, something historically significant, or something we never want to forget. The intergenerational component is what is most special.”

Kelvin Beachum graduated from SMU in 2010 with a B.A. in Economics and earned a Master of Liberal Studies in Organizational Dynamics in 2012. A four-year starter as offensive tackle for SMU Mustang football, he serves as a member of the Executive Boards for the Simmons School of Education and Human Development and Lyle School of Engineering. Named an SMU Emerging Leader in 2018, Kelvin honored the late Dennis Simon, his political science professor and mentor, by endowing SMU’s annual Civil Rights Pilgrimage in Simon’s name.

Drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers in 2012, Kelvin has played for the Jacksonville Jaguars, the New York Jets and now the Arizona Cardinals during his 10-year NFL career.

Jessica Beachum graduated from Baylor in 2011 with a degree in Sociology. She earned her B.S. in Nursing in 2017 from Duquesne University and her M.S. in Healthcare Delivery in 2021 from Arizona State University.

An exhibition catalogue of Narrative as Reality is available in print and pdf through the website.

OTHER SPRING 2022 EXHIBITIONS AT SMU LIBRARIES

Two other exhibitions at SMU Libraries offer excellent opportunities for visitors this spring. At DeGolyer Library, the exhibition, Black Lives, Black Letters: Primary Sources in African American History, opens February 10. It features archival holdings of the Library including rare books, pamphlets, broadsides, sheet music, prints, photographs, manuscripts, and ephemera documenting aspects of the Black experience in America, from the colonial period to the present. Among figures represented in the exhibition are documents from Phillis Wheatley to Toni Morrison, from Frederick Douglass to Barack Obama. Other figures, some who are unknown, portray Black lives in many fields.

Bridwell Library’s exhibition, A Symbiosis of Script, Font, and Form: A Selection of Artists’ Books, open through March 31, draws from the Library’s Special Collection. The selections for this exhibition offers artists’ books “in which artists or circles of collaborators have integrated corporeal elements of the book form into the literature in sensitive and sometimes astounding ways.”

More information: https://www.smu.edu/Libraries, or email hawngallery@smu.edu.

Fall ’21 and spring ’22 screenings for Ghosts of Lost Futures

Curator and artist, Mike Morris, and his collaborators on the experimental videos, Ghosts of Lost Futures, have been busy with additional screenings of this program of works. Ghosts premiered at the Dallas Museum of Art in the Horchow Auditorium on May 22 with ten works by ten experimental video artists commissioned to re-interpret film footage from the WFAA Newsfilm archive. The footage from the Hamon’s G. William Jones Video and Film Archive was selected from 1970 to recognize the year of the archive’s establishment. Due to COVID, the first screening was postponed over one year later.

Since this screening at the DMA, Ghosts was in the line-up of screenings for the Experimental Response Cinema, sponsored by the Austin Film Society, on November 8. Organized by the artist and program participant, Liz Rhodda, Mike Morris attended virtually to answer questions from a large audience.

Flyers for Archive Fever
Promotional collage assembled by Craig Baldwin for Archive Fever program, San Francisco’s Other Cinema

On November 20, selected works from Ghosts screened with other video works at San Francisco’s Other Cinema’s annual Archive Fever program. Selected films were:

Curt Heiner – The Stars of Texas Shine Tonight

Lisa McCarty – Undelivered Remarks

Zak Loyd – Deep River / Ocean of Storms 

Angelo Madsen Minax – Stay with me, the world is a devastating place

Marwa Benhalim – The Void Remembers

This spring, the video works will be featured at another experimental film festival, Experiments in Cinema, in Albuquerque. The dates for this screening have yet to be slated. Please check the EIC website for screening updates. The selections of videos will include:

Curt Heiner – The Stars of Texas Shine Tonight

Lisa MCarty – Undelivered Remarks 

Tramaine Townsend – FRAMES.-DALLUS 

Zak Loyd – Deep River / Ocean of Storms 

Angelo Madsen Minax – Stay with me, the world is a devastating place

Liz Rodda – Amid Flowers, Crowns, and Tears 

Marwa Benhalim – The Void Remembers 

Blog post: Mike Morris, curator and artist; and Beverly Mitchell, Assistant Director, Hamon Arts Library

Skin Hunger – interactive installation in Hamon Arts Library, October 26-31

Skin Hunger screen shotSkin Hunger is a telematic installation that plays on the zoom-style video-chat that has recently become ubiquitous. Participants can reach across their screens to virtually ‘touch’ one another.  By touching or moving together, participants create visuals and sounds that emerge and evolve from participant relation and interaction making the intangible connection tangible and also giving it life.
 
 
Participants from physically remote locations will be able to interact with each other, connecting participants across Dallas and the United States, including University of Texas Dallas, University of North Texas, and Florida Western University during the same time period, connecting participants in those places.
 
This work was created in response to the stress incurred by lack of touch as a result of social distancing. Lack of touch can result in skin hunger, and leads to feelings of social exclusion. While the remedy for skin hunger is physical touch, we offer a digital alternative.
 
Skin Hunger is a collaborative interactive web-based and telematic installation project realized by Meadows School of the Arts professors Courtney Brown, Melanie Clemmons, Ira Greenberg,  and Brent Brimhall.

Dr. Jacqueline Stewart receives 2021 MacArthur Fellowship

Dr Jaqueline StewartSMU Libraries congratulates Dr. Jacqueline Stewart, film curator, archivist and scholar, on her recent 2021 MacArthur Fellowship. Dr. Stewart has published extensively on black film and filmmaking in the United States. In her video post for the MacArthur Foundation, Dr. Stewart describes her interest in the genre of black films from the early 1920s – 1930s.

Dr. Stewart has visited SMU for at least two events. In 2011, she spoke as a guest lecturer for the Comini series, sponsored by the art history department. In her talk, “Discovering’ Black Film History: Tracing the Tyler, Texas Black Film Collection,” she warned of the easy appeal to label these, or any, films as rediscovered along with the danger of neglecting them in an archive.

Dr. Jacqueline Stewart’s MacArthur “Genius grant” is a tribute to her important scholarship on the Black-audience movies of the 1920s-1940s, her archival work, and dedication to teaching a broadening and inclusive history of American cinema. No one else in the history of academic cinema and media studies has achieved the positions of influence she has attained in the past two years: Regular host of TCM’s Silent Sunday Nights, Chief artistic and programming officer for the new Hollywood Academy Museum of Motion Picture History, and MacArthur research grant fellow. In each capacity, she is, and will be, a powerful and influential teacher.

– Professor Rick Worland, Division of Film & Media Arts

More recently, she has written about the Tyler Film Collection in the G. William Jones Film and Video Collection. With Yale scholar, Charles Musser, Dr. Stewart curated the films and wrote accompanying materials for the Pioneers of African American Cinema box DVD set, of which the Tyler Film Collection is included. This collection is available for viewing through the Hamon Arts Library.


Image of Dr. Stewart: © MacArthur Foundation.

Report from the Red Carpet – The Velvet Underground at the Cannes Film Festival

Grand Theatre Lumiere red carpetAfter a thorough bout of negotiations, the previously lost film footage of the Velvet Underground performing at a Vietnam War protest at Dallas’ White Rock Lake in 1969 has made it into The Velvet Underground, a documentary directed by Todd Haynes. The documentary, mirroring the name of the band itself, contains this special footage that was initially discovered and digitized by the G. William Jones Film and Video Archive Team right here at SMU.

Canne Film Festival logo on chairs

The Velvet Underground premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in the South of France this past July at the Grand Théâtre Lumière, the festival’s largest and most prestigious theatre. The event was attended by many, including director Todd Haynes, singer/model Jane Birkin, actress Helen Mirren, and me, a recently graduated SMU film student. The documentary was well received by audiences and ended up being the favorite Emily Cook and friendof many out of the entire festival’s lineup of films. The clips from White Rock Lake appear towards the middle of the film and are very “blink and you might miss it.” As I was a student intern at the G. William Jones Archive, I was delighted when I recognized the clips from White Rock Lake. It was amazing to see a special piece of SMU abroad, especially in such a personal way.

CannesFor all of those in the SMU community who want to see our contribution to this incredible documentary, The Velvet Underground will make its American debut October 15, 2021 on Apple TV+.

 

 

 


Blog post: Emily Cook (standing on right), SMU film student graduate (2021) and G. William Jones Film & Video intern

CML talk with curator, Lilia Kudelia on Oct. 6 at 5:30 pm

Curatorial Minds Lab: Virtual Lecture with Guest Curator Lilia Kudelia

 

Wednesday, October 6, 2021

5:30 p.m.

Zoom lecture

FREE

Sophia Salinas and Lilia Kudelia

Lilia Kudelia is a curator and art historian. Her research focuses on the artistic movements and infrastructures in the post-communist states, cultural heritage and restitution, television and art from the 1960s onwards. As a guest curator at Residency Unlimited in New York, she develops residencies for the laureates of the Young Visual Artists Awards, a network of 12 awards in countries of Eastern, Central and Southern Europe. She has previously held curatorial and research positions at Dallas Contemporary in Dallas, Texas, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. and the Art Arsenal in Kyiv, Ukraine. In 2017, Kudelia co-curated the Ukrainian National Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennale, which featured work by photographer Boris Mikhailov. She holds an M.A. in art history from the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University and a B.A. in cultural studies from the National University of Kyiv-Mohyla Academy in Ukraine, and was a visiting scholar at the University of Toronto, Canada. The talk, moderated by Sophia Salinas, is presented as part of the Curatorial Minds Lab, a new initiative of the Hamon Arts Library’s Hawn Gallery and the Pollock Gallery at SMU that gives five Fellows – made up of alumni and current students – an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the historical development of curatorial practices and study contemporary art display theory and practice.

To attend the virtual lecture, visit https://smu.zoom.us/j/95072889069. For more information, visit https://pollockgallery.art/Curatorial-Minds-Lab or email Sofia Bastidas-Vivar, director of the Pollock Gallery, at abastidas@smu.edu.

 

 

CML talk with curator, Taylor Renee Aldridge on Sept. 22 at 5:30 pm

Taylor Aldridge photo

Curatorial Minds Lab: Virtual Lecture with Guest Curator Taylor Renee Aldridge

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

5:30 p.m.

Zoom lecture

FREE

Taylor Renee Aldridge is the visual arts curator and program manager at the California African American Museum (CAAM). Prior, she worked as a writer and independent curator in Detroit, Michigan. She has organized exhibitions with the Detroit Institute of Arts, Detroit Artist Market, Cranbrook Art Museum, and The Luminary (St. Louis). In 2015, along with art critic Jessica Lynne, she co-founded ARTS.BLACK, a journal of art criticism for Black perspectives. Her writing has appeared in ArtforumThe Art NewspaperArt21ARTNewsFriezeHarper’s BazaarCanadian ArtDetroit Metro Times, and SFMoMA’s Open Space.  The lecture is presented as part of the Curatorial Minds Lab, a new initiative of the Hamon Arts Library’s Hawn Gallery and the Pollock Gallery at SMU that gives five Fellows – made up of alumni and current students – an opportunity to deepen their understanding of the historical development of curatorial practices and study contemporary art display theory and practice.

CML logoTo attend the virtual lecture, visit https://smu.zoom.us/j/91045080064.For more information, visit https://pollockgallery.art/Curatorial-Minds-Lab or email Pollock Gallery Director Sofia Bastidas at abastidas@smu.edu.