Bywaters Special Collections Artist Profile: Blanche McVeigh

Featured in the exhibition Texas Women Artists: Selections from Bywaters Special Collections, on the 2nd floor of Hamon Arts Library.

Blanche McVeigh was born in St. Charles, Missouri in 1895 and moved to Fort Worth as a child.  She received her art training at the St. Louis School of Fine Arts, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and the Art Students League in New York.  McVeigh spent a year in Europe where she became interested in the medium of aquatint, a printmaking technique related to engraving and etching that allows an artist to create variations of shading within the print image.

 

McVeigh spent her adult life in Fort Worth where she taught figure drawing and printmaking. In 1932 she joined Evaline Sellors and Wade Jolley, both professional artists, in establishing the Fort Worth School of Fine Arts in the Little Theatre building behind the Women’s Club.  McVeigh and Sellors also helped found the Fort Worth Artists Guild, the first institution to display work by local artists.  McVeigh was also a member of the Printmakers Guild and in 1951 was elected to serve as the organization’s president.

McVeigh received awards for her work from the Dallas Print Club, the Connecticut Academy of Fine Arts, the Texas Fine Arts Association, and the Southern States Art League.  In 1944 her aquatint Decatur Courthouse was awarded the Neiman-Marcus and Dallas Print Society Purchase Prize of $100 in the Fourth Annual Texas Print Exhibition at the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts.  The Library of Congress also purchased Decatur Courthouse for its permanent collection.  Her work is located in other national collections:  Carnegie Institute, Princeton University, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, and Smithsonian Institution.

Blanche McVeigh died in Fort Worth on June 1, 1970.


[1] Farmer, David.  “The Printmakers Guild and Women Printmakers in Texas 1939 – 1965,” Prints and Printmakers of Texas:  Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual North American Print Conference, (Austin:  Texas State Historical Association, 1997), p. 124.

[1] Handbook of Texas Online, Linda Peterson, “McVeigh, Blanche,” accessed July 27, 2017, http://www.tshaonline.org/handbook/online/articles/fmcbf

Image: Blanche McVeigh, ca. early 1920s, original dimensions:  8” (H) x 5” (W)
Courtesy of The Jerry Bywaters Collection on Art of the Southwest, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University

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Hawn Gallery Presents: Collective Practice: Community Building through Zines – Works by Puro Chingón Collective

The Hawn Gallery presents

Collective Practice: Community Building Through Zines
Works by Puro Chingón Collective

On view: October 20 – December 15, 2017

 Opening Reception: Friday, October 20th, 5-7pm
at the Hawn Gallery, located in the Hamon Arts Library at SMU

Artists Claudia Zapata, James Huizar, and Claudia Aparicio-Gamundi will conduct a gallery talk at the opening at 5:45 p.m.

Puro Chingón Collective is comprised of James Huizar, Claudia Zapata and Claudia Aparicio-Gamundi. The Collective formed after they began publishing their zine, ChingoZine, a publication dedicated to showing works by Latinx artists. Zines are short for magazines, but rather than ones seen on newsstands, they are noncommercial, homemade, or online publications containing subject matter that reflects the community in which they are created. The Collective’s practice is one rooted in social practice and engages with people in public spaces through murals, film screenings, and parties. The public events are largely hosted in Austin and focus on celebrating Latinx arts and culture through film screenings and interactive events. During the film events, members are given props so they can participate with movies such as Mi Vida Loca, Y Tu Mama Tambien and Selena.

Continue reading “Hawn Gallery Presents: Collective Practice: Community Building through Zines – Works by Puro Chingón Collective”

State Fair of Texas – a look back from the G. Williams Jones Film and Video Collection

[wpvideo r8iZIKXM]

In celebration of this year’s State Fair of Texas, the G. William Jones Film and Video Collection put together this compilation of clips.  Taken from several months of the archive’s 16mm WFAA Newsfilm Collection, this twenty-three minute piece largely without sound showcases the evolution of the fair throughout the 1960s, highlighting the attendees and fair grounds, the food and the games, and the attractions and parades as each evolved over the course of a tumultuous decade of cultural and political change, while still remaining fundamentally the same, as it does even to this day.  

To see similar footage (and other archive highlights), please follow us on Twitter @smujonesfilm and at the G. William Jones Film & Video Collection Group page on Facebook.


Image: Film still of the entrance to the rides at the Midway, State Fair of Texas, G. William Jones Film & Video Collection, SMU, 1960s

Blog post: Courtesy of Jeremy Spracklen, Moving Image Curator, Hamon Arts Library

Bywaters Special Collections Artist Profile: Florence Elliott McClung

Featured in the exhibition Texas Women Artists: Selections from Bywaters Special Collections, on the 2nd floor of Hamon Arts Library.

Florence McClung (1894 – 1992) was born in St. Louis, Missouri to Charles W. and Minerva White.  In 1899 she moved with her parents to Dallas where in 1912 she graduated from Bryan High School.  In 1917, she married Rufus A. McClung and together they made their home in Dallas.   In the early 1920s McClung started her art training with prominent Dallas artists Frank Reaugh, Frank Klepper, Olin Travis, Alexandre Hogue, and Tom Stell.  During the 1920s and 1930s McClung traveled to Taos, New Mexico where she painted scenes around the area, studied the pueblo Indians and their crafts, and became friends with well-known Taos luminaries Mabel Dodge and Tony Luhan.  Around 1930, McClung was hired by Trinity University, then located in Waxahachie, Texas to form and head the art department, a post she maintained until 1943 when the school moved to San Antonio.  On class days, McClung would drive from Dallas to Waxahachie and return each day.

McClung was a well-established artist by the late 1930s.  Her painting Lancaster Valley (1936) was purchased from the New York World’s Fair by the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York – the first work by a Texas artist represented at the museum up to that time.  McClung’s education continued in Dallas where in 1939 she received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Art and English and a Bachelor of Science degree in Education at Southern Methodist University. In 1941 she studied lithography at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center with Adolph Dehn, a well-established American lithographer based in New York.

During World War II McClung’s print Home Front, was selected for inclusion in the exhibition America in the War (August 1943) at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.  In 1944 her print My Son, My Son was selected from a Library of Congress exhibition for the cover of a Red Cross magazine. McClung also served as the daytime air raid warden for her street in Dallas and completed courses in Air Raids, First Aid, Nutrition, and Home Nursing.

Today McClung’s work is represented in permanent collections:  Dallas Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum (New York), Library of Congress (Washington, D. C.), Panhandle-Plains Historical Museum (Canyon, Texas), and High Museum (Atlanta, Georgia).

Florence McClung died at age 97 on March 15, 1992 in Dallas.


Image: Devil’s Gulch, Block print (linocut), 1976, original dimensions (image): 17” H x
14” W

Courtesy of Florence McClung Collection, Gift of Bill and Tony McClung, Bywaters Special Collections, Hamon Arts Library, Southern Methodist University