Leaving the Cocoon: Art Road Trips in Texas in May

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Travelling recently to Houston for a family event, I had the opportunity to consider the differences between the Houston art scene and that with which I am more familiar, Dallas/Fort Worth. Unlike the art districts in Dallas and Fort Worth, the museums and galleries of Houston are a bit more scattered. When you are in one of the venues in Houston, you are not aware that you are in an arts area. It takes more work to take in all of them; considerable sweating occurs in getting from one to the next.

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Martha Graham and Isamu Noguchi: A multi-decade collaboration

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Martha Graham and ensemble in Appalachian Spring, Photo: Library of Congress

This spring’s Meadows at the Winspear event included a performance by the Meadows Dance Ensemble and Meadows Symphony Orchestra of Martha Graham’s Appalachian Spring, one of the best known choreographic works of Graham’s repertoire, which premiered in 1944. For the production of this dance, Graham enlisted the collaboration of Aaron Copland, who won a Pulitzer Prize for the music, and the sculptor, Isamu Noguchi, who designed the spare set suggestive of prairie construction. Noguchi’s and Copland’s individual contributions to the ballet were both influenced by Shaker design. The rocking chair, featured prominently downstage in the dance was, according to Noguchi, “a Shaker rocking chair, a seat which is also a sculpture or a sculpture which may be a sat on.”[1] Clearly, the artist thought of these sets as an extension of sculpture in space. He reveals that he conceived of large spaces “as relationships to a whole.”[2]

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Collection Spotlight: Mary Frances Doyle art work and papers

Mary Doyle (1904 – 2000), a Texas native, devoted her adult life to the art education of Dallas children and to the printmaking profession. She participated in many of the exhibitions organized by the women’s printmaking group the Texas Printmakers, formerly the Printmakers Guild, and remained active in art education organizations and other art groups: the Arlington [Texas] Art Association, the Dallas Art Education Club, the Dallas Museum of [Fine] Arts, the Dallas Print Society, and the Texas Fine Arts Association. The collection includes artwork, clippings, correspondence, documents, photographs, publicity, and published works related to her teaching and art career. The artwork consists of works by Doyle and her contemporaries. Continue reading “Collection Spotlight: Mary Frances Doyle art work and papers”

Get in formation: a Lemonade syllabus

Many of us have been on an emotional rollercoaster since Beyoncé gifted us with her visual album Lemonade on April 23. Putting aside our concern for Bey and Jay’s marriage, the album itself is aurally and visually stunning and has received high critical acclaim. Lemonade premiered on HBO, and being especially proud of the part they played in its release, the network plans to submit Lemonade for Emmy consideration. Continue reading “Get in formation: a Lemonade syllabus”

Inside Out/Outside In: Investigating the implications of the built environment on Veterans diagnosed with combat-related PTSD

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The Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming. PANELISTS: Donna Cranston, Executive Director of Defenders of Freedom; SFC Jody Thompson (RET); Tina Bass, M.S., LPC, Psychotherapist, UT Dallas Center for Brain Health; Christina Donaldson, Interior Design Strategist, Gensler. MODERATORS: Dr. Alicia Meuret, Director, Anxiety and Depression Research Center, SMU; and Scott Gleeson ’09, Independent Visual Artist.

The Hamon blog team invited Christina Donaldson, an interior designer and researcher, who participated in the panel discussion at Hamon on PTSD, The Social Costs of War: Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming, on April 5th, to contribute a posting on her research. This panel discussion was organized in conjunction with the Hawn Gallery exhibition, Travels in Ithaca, on view at Hamon until May 16th. Donaldson’s research examines the intersection of interior design and psychology, and how this interdisciplinary approach may yield a better understanding of combat-related PTSD.

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