Collection Spotlight: Little Theatre of Dallas collection

The Little Theatre of Dallas was founded in Dallas in 1920 to provide the city with quality theatre performed by non-professional actors from the community and reflects the many facets and stages of the organization from its inception to its final demise in the late 1950s. Continue reading “Collection Spotlight: Little Theatre of Dallas collection”

Ed Bland: American urban classical composer

Several years ago when I was brainstorming for a doctoral performance project, I knew that I wanted to deal with something that had to deal with African-American composers.  This was because through all my studies I found that black composers were seldom represented in the classroom and on the performance stage.  After some initial research I came across the works of Ed Bland mostly because it seemed he had many compositions for clarinet (my instrument).  After acquiring his album Urban Classical, I became fascinated by the music I was listening to and decided to focus my research on him. Continue reading “Ed Bland: American urban classical composer”

Gems from the Tyler, Texas Black Film Collection

The Tyler, Texas Black Film Collection is one of the signature collections of the G. William Jones Film & Video Collection. This collection of race films from the 1930s and 1940s were discovered in an East Texas warehouse in 1983 on miraculously well-preserved nitrate stock and transferred to safety film in 1985. With the advent of digital technology, this important collection of film history has been digitally restored and made available in the SMU Digital Collections. We’ve written before about the travels of the collection’s most well-know title, The Blood of Jesus. Here are three lesser-known gems of the collection with clips.

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Rereading Argos as an Index of Imperiled Selfhood Among Returning Combat Veterans

 

In a memorable scene set in a hotel room in the film, Apocalypse Now, Captain Benjamin Willard, experiencing a fit of delirium, smashes a mirror with his fist and then smears the blood from his wounded hand on his face. The interrelated themes of transformation and recognition introduced in this scene, through the symbol of the mirror and the blood-obscured visage, appear in ancient art as they do throughout western popular culture, underscoring the significance of the transformative effects of war on the body and the psyche of the individual.

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Megan Heuer talks about the new research service at Umphey Lee

Megan is here

Q: Tell us about your new research service at Umphrey Lee (ULee), and when you are available.

Megan: I will host office hours for walk-in reference and research help in ULee 256 on Tuesdays, 10 – 12:30 and Wednesdays, 12 – 2:30. Some will recognize that location as the old Tech Effect office across from the Temerlin reception area. Watch for the six foot sign with my doppelganger on it that will be put out when I am on location.

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Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson – an Introduction

SuitorsofIthaca

This posting on the exhibition, Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson, which opened in the Hawn Gallery of the Hamon Arts Library on January 25th, is the first of several postings by the artist. This posting presents a summary of the exhibition. This and future postings are intended as a series of dialogs between the artist and the community viewing and reading about the exhibition, and the artist invites comments from readers.

Travels in Ithaca: New Paintings by Scott Gleeson is on view through May 16th, and the Gallery is accessible during the Library’s open hours (Hamon calendar).

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Spiders, farms, and bubbles: How to become an expert internet searcher

You probably use Google every day, but do you know how search engines impact the information you are seeing? Learn how to get better information, faster on the Internet in the workshop “Spiders, Farms, and Bubbles: How to Become an Expert Internet Searcher” presented by Megan Heuer, Communication Arts Librarian. We will explore how search engines impact our results, the typical human behaviors that limit good research, and strategies and tools for becoming a thoughtful Internet searcher. Continue reading “Spiders, farms, and bubbles: How to become an expert internet searcher”