Meet Jeremy Spracklen, Film Preservation Technician

 

Jeremy Spracklen is the Film Preservation Technician for the G. William Jones Film & Video Collection at the Hamon Arts Library. He received his undergraduate degrees in History and Philosophy and recently earned his MA in History – all from the University of Texas at Arlington. Additionally, Jeremy is the Projectionist at the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth as well as the Traverse City and Telluride Film Festivals. Furthermore, he has served as the Technical Director for the USA Film Festival since 2002. In addition to his technical duties for film festivals, Jeremy has also put together commissioned tributes for visiting actors and directors, including Rob Reiner, Ed Harris, Carol Kane, Wes Anderson and Malcolm McDowell. Spracklen also recently presented his thesis Cinema I & II: A History of the Movies in Dallas as Seen through NorthPark’s Iconic Theater at this year’s Dallas VideoFest and also recently worked with 70mm Ultra Panavision format in Quentin Tarantino’s upcoming film The Hateful Eight. Continue reading “Meet Jeremy Spracklen, Film Preservation Technician”

Pictorial: Paws and take a break

Continue reading “Pictorial: Paws and take a break”

Therapy dogs in the Taubman Atrium, December 9th

Take a break from finals to stop by the Taubman Atrium 11am-3pm on December 9th to visit with our four-legged friends. We are proud to partner with A New Leash on Life for this event. Research has shown that spending 5-24 minutes with a calm dog reduces blood pressure and the levels of stress hormones in the body. Continue reading “Therapy dogs in the Taubman Atrium, December 9th”

The travels of The Blood of Jesus

One of the most significant of the Tyler Race Films is The Blood of Jesus, written by and starring Spencer Williams.  As with many of Williams’ films, this is a study of the continuing conflict between good and evil, holiness and godlessness, church and juke joint.  Williams filmed it with a largely amateur cast and with a minimal budget in 1941 for distribution to the 1200 or so movie houses that catered to all-black audiences at that time.   Despite the limitations imposed by its restrictively small budget, “The Blood of Jesus” was a financial success. Continue reading “The travels of The Blood of Jesus”

Reflections on Paper Dolls

Even the most incurious visitor to the Hamon Arts Library cannot have helped but notice the six works posted near the entryway.  These pieces are part of a series entitled “Paper Dolls,” by Colleen Shull (SMU MFA ’11) and Justin Shull (former SMU Division of Art Adjunct Lecturer).  This show, curated by guest curator Shannon Maylath, features pictures from fashion magazines that have been altered, scratched, cut, torn and crumpled…exploded as it were.
The images are recognizable but transformed, altered from their original appearance and context in such a way that the viewer is confronted both with the symbols of fashion and the formal aspects of the images…the colors, the sense of depth, the juxtaposition of the conventions of fashion photography made mysterious by the alterations.   These images are reborn, visible and present in a way the original photographs were not. Continue reading “Reflections on Paper Dolls”

Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings, 1938 on display

Please stop by the second-floor gallery outside of Bywaters Special Collections and view how the portfolio XTOL by Octavio Medellin was researched by the artist in 1938 and later published in 1947 by the Dallas Museum of Fine Arts, which preceded the Dallas Museum of Art. Work began in 1938 when Octavio Medellin spent six months studying the Mayan ruins at Chichén Itzá and Uxmal, located on the Yucatán in Mexico, and documented his travels with 181 black and white photographs that he compiled into a scrapbook entitled Maya – Toltec, Temples and Carvings, 1938 [all photographs in the exhibition are reproductions]. Continue reading “Octavio Medellin: Maya-Toltec Temples and Carvings, 1938 on display”

Robert Craft (1923-2015): An improbable life

American conductor and musicologist Robert Craft passed away on November 10 at the age of 92. Craft was best known as the advisor and close friend of Igor Stravinsky from 1948 until Stravinsky’s death in 1971; at times, he even lived in the Stravinsky home. But Craft was also a tastemaker in American classical music during the 20th century. He championed the works of composers Arnold Schönberg, Anton Webern, and Alban Berg by conducting and recording their music. He recorded a collection of Webern’s complete works, and he collaborated closely with Stravinsky and conducted recording sessions and premieres of the composer’s later works. Continue reading “Robert Craft (1923-2015): An improbable life”